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Simply Smiles provides bright futures for children, families, and communities. The organization partners with populations in need to create physical and emotional environments where suffering is alleviated and from which local leaders can emerge.

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Simply Smiles blog

Follow our blog and read insights from Simply Smiles staff, volunteers and other individuals whose lives are affected by our work!

Filtering by Tag: camp

Field Notes from the Reservation: First Church of Stamford, take two!

Alex Gross

We often say one of the most challenging elements of volunteering at our project sites is how to best articulate all of the things that happen over the course of day and to share these occurrences with friends and loved ones back home. While we do follow a schedule and have plans for the week, there are a number of events - small or large - that can make the volunteer experience even more memorable. In this Field Note, our friends from the First Congregational Church of Stamford, Connecticut try their hand at describing parts or reflections from their days, with snippets from numerous volunteer perspectives! We're happy to have the Stamford crew back on the Reservation this week - their second volunteer experience with us!


No rest for the weary! It's right to work on Sunday for our Stamford friends, including pellet shed construction ! (La Plant, August 2016)

No rest for the weary! It's right to work on Sunday for our Stamford friends, including pellet shed construction ! (La Plant, August 2016)

"Yesterday was the 'lazy Sunday' here in La Plant, although the definition of lazy out here must be different from what we are used to because, by the end of the day, I think we were all feeling exhausted and ready for a good night's rest. We were privileged to be given an amazing tour by Sam, who so eloquently spoke about the reality of life in this town and on the Reservation. It is something hard to put into words and yet she did it so well, I know that I wished that I could have recorded her and played it back so that when asked what it is like here I could have her words inspire everyone like they did me. She said that it is 'tangible hopelessness' and yet come time for the town wide dinner at the end of the day I felt as though it had shifted in just a year's time to become a tangible hope. More people attended the community dinner than I had seen attend any single event last year. Children grabbed our hands and pulled us to the playground. I can remember last year beginning the process of building the playground. Digging the holes that would be foundation for the swingset and building the rock wall. It’s amazing how it has become the center for the children's play and an icebreaker for people of all ages. Here's to more play to come." ­ - Emma Jelliffe

Pillow-making fun at camp! (La Plant, August 2016)

Pillow-making fun at camp! (La Plant, August 2016)

"Positivity encourages progress. Something as small as watching my cousin push a child on a swing are drastic changes for the Lakota people. Last year, it would have taken days for them to be comfortable to be around us in such a way. To see them so open to the new people this year is truly a sight to behold. Anyone from the trip last year can attest to this. But my favorite part of the day was watching my grandmother. Yes, the leader of the group and one of the older members, years do not apply to her. I watched her conversate with the good Lakota people of La Plant whether in their cars or on a bench she asked about their lives and how things have changed. She followed the children to the playground, or 'park' as they love to call it, and pushed them on swings. She even climbed to the top of the climbing wall and watched the youth of La Plant, the sun go down. And there sitting beside her I noticed an amazing thing. A boy we had previously met before who bluntly called people names and swore and cursed at my grandmother was now beside her laughing and holding her hand. What a great change this place has hope! What great change, this place has promise. What great change this place has a future." ­ - Shanika Bello

Learning about horses - and taking a spin! - at camp on Monday! (La Plant, August 2016)

Learning about horses - and taking a spin! - at camp on Monday! (La Plant, August 2016)

"Coffee tastes good this morning with the wind blowing across the extraordinary land. Sleep came easily last night after a busy day painting the ceilings in the two new houses being built this summer. The town wide dinner was so well attended ­ lots of children enjoying the playground constructed last summer. How much fun to watch the teenage boys and girls playing a competitive game of basketball ­ the girls are amazing. I am honored to be here again this year. ­  

"Monday was a productive day of flooring, painting, molding, stucco, taping. Camp was fantastic: 37 pillows made, drawing, friendship bracelets, basketball, playground, music camp. A friend brought his horses for the kids to ride. Evening brought heat lightning to light up the massive sky, followed by thunder and rain and cooler night temps. A great day!" - ­ Leslie Loop

Intense puzzle piecing and getting crafty at camp!

Intense puzzle piecing and getting crafty at camp!

"Good afternoon in camp. Quality time with master puzzle maker and budding artist!"­ - Bob Loop

"As we stood outside doing the dishes from last night's dinner we were privileged to witness the most spectacular sunsets, absolutely jaw dropping. Life has a way of restoring your soul, of giving you what you need if you simply stay open to it! Another highlight of the day was riding a horse!!" -­ John Jelliffe

Field Notes from the Reservation: Doin’ Work - Physically, Structurally, and Emotionally

Alex Gross

The latest Field Note is brought to you by our friends from Plymouth Congregational Church of Lawrence, Kansas. They are returning for their second volunteer week here on the Reservation with a passionate, enthusiastic and creative group of adults and high school students. Below, they reflect on their first few days of work projects and camp.


A tight seal of caulk goes on our new home!

A tight seal of caulk goes on our new home!

Plymouth Youth Group’s first full day of scheduled activities in La Plant, South Dakota with Simply Smiles ended with sweat, tired muscles and many more new, meaningful, personal connections to the families and specifically the children of the Cheyenne River Reservation.

“When we were setting up the trusses, at first it was just work,” says Alexis Hickman, “but it dawned on me later that I was literally building a house for a family. Especially, after seeing the trailer they currently lived in, and how badly they needed this house.”

“Pouring over thirty bags of concrete was exhausting, but it was very fulfilling to see the end result,” says Tristan Kramar.

“To put something down solid, in concrete, helped to underscore the permanence of what we were doing,” says Rose Winmore.

Both Tristan and Rose also spoke about the family for which they were constructing the concrete path, specifically the two year old son, D.J., who they got to play with and who tried to help out in the process by adding little handfuls of dirt into the concrete mix.

After the day’s work projects came the more, truly, exhausting, yet much more impactful work in the Simply Smiles Day Camp as a bus load of kids as young as four and as old as thirteen rolled up to the community center. 

“I was blown away by how fast the kids all learned our names, or how they remembered the names of the people who came here last year,” says Jasmine Hawk. “They genuinely seemed excited to see us, to meet us.” 

“The new faces,” says Doug Beene, “seem to provide an escape from their present realities.” 

“For them to remember those who came back,” says Rose, “I guess, in a way, that these people cared about you for more than just one week a year.”

The day camp is a safe space where kids can socialize and play without fear or uncertainty hanging over them. “I got to see two little kindergarteners become instant friends at the bubble station,” Rose says. “They took joy in having the common ground of being the same age, going into kindergarten the next year.” Simply Smiles gave them that place for an introduction. 

Bubble fun at camp!

Bubble fun at camp!

“Honestly,” Tristan says, “I wish I could be a part of the camp all day, instead of working on the projects. Yes, you see progress on the houses, but you see even more progress in making connections with these kids, having great conversations. It produces an even more important form of progress.”

The construction projects are not short on producing powerfully emotional impacts as well though. 

“To be here, to see a house close to being finished, or to see it finished,” Alexis says, “is amazing. To know you were a part of that is amazing.”

The houses that Simply Smiles volunteers help to create provide an invaluable sense of independence for the families who move into them. Being allowed to be a part of this work doesn’t simply create a self congratulating reward of being some sort of liberating savior. Rather, it’s about extending a hand with gratitude for the experience and seeing that paid back through the interactions with the youngest of the reservation and through them the future and recognition of growing pride within the La Plant community that reminds us all of the brotherhood and sisterhood of a shared humanity.


Field Notes from the Reservation: Field trips & raising walls - all in a day's work

Alex Gross

For the second time this week, volunteers Kathy West and Stu Constantine from First Congregational Church of Stamford bring you their insights from their latest experiences here in La Plant on the Cheyenne River Reservation.

Wednesday marked the midpoint of our week in La Plant. We’ve been lucky with the weather — clear and dry days, not too hot. In fact. the morning today was quite cool with a breeze. We started the day by hosting a community breakfast of waffles with real Vermont maple syrup brought in by the team from Guilford, Vermont. Quite a few people from town joined us, along with some of the kids and we had a full house out on the patio. 

After breakfast the teams continued on the various work projects, making good progress all around. We came back for lunch, and then we all got into the bus for a trip to the river for an afternoon of swimming with the kids. All the kids were teamed up with volunteer buddies to help keep an eye on them in the water. It was a nice way to spend a hot afternoon, and the kids loved to swim and eat snacks. 

River fun! (Z. Gross, August 2015)

River fun! (Z. Gross, August 2015)

After getting back from the river we had just a few minutes to change, then it was back on the bus for a trip to Eagle Butte for dinner and dessert at the local Dairy Queen, a special treat. Everyone is getting along really well, and the kids have been having a great time with so many young people to play with (they seem to have more fun with the high school kids than the grown-ups!). As the week goes on. we’re all settling into the rhythm of this place - taking time getting to know each other and the people in the community and really living in a communal fashion. It’s quite a difference from life back on the East Coast. 

* * * * *

On Thursday morning, we experienced our first South Dakota thunderstorm. It happened right after we finished our morning mile walk. And as promised, the rain turned the dirt into something they refer to as “gumbo”— thick, muddy clay! It took us all day to clean up after tracking it in over and over again (yeah, thanks, I was on floor duty).  

It was a special day for the kids as it was movie day! All the kids and half of the volunteers traveled to Pierre (by the way, pronounced ‘pier’) to see the Minions movie. For some kids, it was the first time that they had seen a movie! Can you imagine having to travel 1 1/2 hours to see a movie?!  

While many were enjoying the air conditioning and popcorn, the rest of us made an amazing amount of progress with the houses that are being built. We finished taping and mudding (compounding) all the rooms, finishing all the interior walls, and fixed the aforementioned soffit. Also, the Vermont crew finished the shed for the completed house. More cement was poured for the continuing pathways and we also finished our huge buffalo cut-outs that were specially designed by the artists in the group! Then we had to dig MORE three foot holes to mount the finished buffalos.

Thursday evening was Artisan Night and the local tribe members came with their beautiful jewelry , etc to sell. They sold out quickly and even had mail orders to start working on.  

Lastly, did we mention that the food has been incredible? The menus consist of a lot of really healthy stuff and we are pretty spoiled now. The work is hard and the kids are a handful, but of course, it is always worthwhile.

During our weekly cooking class, homemade pizza was on the menu, loaded with vegetables, including basil grown in our hydroponics system, and homemade dough! Both delicious and budget friendly! (A.Gross, August 2015, La Plant)

During our weekly cooking class, homemade pizza was on the menu, loaded with vegetables, including basil grown in our hydroponics system, and homemade dough! Both delicious and budget friendly! (A.Gross, August 2015, La Plant)

Field Notes from the Reservation: Well worn hands, open hearts

Alex Gross

Today’s unique Field Note is brought to you by Lucy Burr and Stephanie Stewart, both first-time volunteers from Essex and Farmington, Connecticut respectively. They are part of a mixed group of volunteers who have met for the first time here in South Dakota! Today, they reflect on what they've learned from their first few days with us here in La Plant.

It is night four and we nine volunteers agree:

  1. The dedication of the Simply Smiles founder and staff is amazing in its work ethic, cultural respect, resolve, patience, determination, kindness and inspiration.

  2. The work to be done in La Plant is hard, emotional, uplifting, and so much more.

  3. We came prepared to use our hands.

  4. We are surprised at the pain in our hearts.

  5. Our impatience urges us to give and do, which is faster than teaching.

  6. We are frustrated by OUR people’s political/administrative mistreatment.

  7. We enjoy celebrating this community’s dance contest winners at the annual powwow.

  8. The kids are eager to see the smiles greeting them at camp, ready to give them our full attention in a friendly place and spend a few hours on a summer day.

Helping hands in the garden! These young farmers helped to harvest garlic in the garden! (A.Gross, July 2015, La Plant)

Helping hands in the garden! These young farmers helped to harvest garlic in the garden! (A.Gross, July 2015, La Plant)


Field Notes from the Reservation: Settling in, tapping into talents

Alex Gross

This week's Field Note is brought to you by first-time Reservation volunteer Janet Huley. 

Last night (Sunday), Simply Smiles hosted a large group of families of all ages during its town-wide meal.  Teenaged boys and girls flocked to the recently-completed basketball court and divided into teams with mostly the younger interns and volunteers. 

Parents and grandparents sat down and were eagerly served delicious vegetable pasta with watermelon salad. Some of the ingredients were from the garden and greenhouse behind the big sign that serves as a windbreak and declares to the passing traffic, “La Plant Grows Its Own Food!” One boy asked me suspiciously what the red cubes were in his salad, so I asked him to taste them and tell me if they were a vegetable or a fruit. “Fruit!” he declared. I tried to get him or his brother to sit still for a sketch, but all I could manage were some features before they joined in the games with all the other kids. 

I got two sisters to sit for their portrait for longer and found that there were many critics their age who would take a look and assure the sister “It doesn’t look like you!” The older sister told me that I didn’t draw very well, so I responded that I was rusty and needed more practice; perhaps after drawing for awhile I would do better. She then offered to draw my portrait, and while drawing she kept saying she wasn’t a good drawer and she didn’t know how. She was very hard on herself. I kept telling her that she should draw what pleases her, and never mind what she thought it should look like - to draw it the way she saw it, and if she liked it, that was the most important thing. Her picture of me was wonderful, with many details like my earrings and clothes. I got to keep her picture of me and in turn, she asked for and I gave her my portraits of her, her sister, and her cousins. 

I talked with some of the parents and grandparents and some were outgoing and gregarious, while some were shy and reserved. Everyone lingered over the meal, and we discussed the new playground that I could see would really help. Sometimes the younger children are hesitant to join in on basketball with the older kids, and so they need a safe place to play where people can keep a watchful eye on them!

Monday began our workday. We had assignments, some of which were geared toward our interests and talents. I was working in designing and implementing a book club sign with several other very talented, creative people. We sketched it out and tried out different designs before finding a suitable piece of wood for the sign and the books we wanted to hang on it. We decided that each book title that the club read would be painted on a little piece of wood with the year, and placed on the sign. We found painting supplies and divided up the work, in addition to priming and painting signs for the vegetable garden. 

A new sign is created to celebrate Book Club milestones! Each book completed will be marked on the Book Club board! (A.Gross, La Plant, July 2015)

A new sign is created to celebrate Book Club milestones! Each book completed will be marked on the Book Club board! (A.Gross, La Plant, July 2015)

Next to us, my husband, who is also volunteering this week, was working on building a tent for holding music camp. He was in his element working with a team of enthusiastic volunteers digging stakes and assembling this tent that will shade a group of kids on Tuesday. Elsewhere, a group was preparing the ground for the playground, and everyday we share the chores of everyday living.

Earlier we toured an almost-finished house, and a house in progress. Inspired by the future, we were told we were going to help unload two new houses - by hand! - to be delivered this week.

Summer camp brought back some of the kids we had seen on Sunday, and we were ready with many activities. I couldn’t get anyone to allow me to paint their face, but they did allow me to paint buffalo, suns, basketballs, Minions, and wolves howling at the moon on their hands and arms. In turn, I got a Minion on my hand and some blue faceprint, too. Kids tie-dyed bandanas, decorated treasure boxes, drew with chalk, played beanbags and made friendship bracelets. 

In the reading nook, I was privileged to have one read a whole book out loud to me. 


Field Notes from the Reservation: Raising walls, making friends

Alex Gross

This mid-week Field Note is a collective post by the student and faculty volunteers from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, CT (which also happens to be Gaby's alma mater! )

We arrived on Saturday, June 20th and, as soon as we arrived, the fun started. This week is dedicated to health promotion with topics that including nutrition, dental care, heart health, and diabetes. Some of the students and faculty are from different concentrations in the health professions, and we have some individuals from the social work department.

We didn’t know what to expect coming onto the Reservation, but we all came in with an open mind and positive thoughts for the week ahead.  

On our first full day, we went on a wonderful tour of the Community Center and the town of La Plant, and we started to learn about the culture and the Lakota. At a first glance, the homes looked like a safe place to live and to raise a family. When Sam started to tell us stories, the group started to realize just how severe the living conditions were for some families, both physically and emotionally. It was challenging to hear about the way some children lived and to hear about the school system. It was disheartening to hear that education is not valued, and that children had few hopes or ambition before Simply Smiles. These anecdotes moved us to be a change in the community and to make the most out of the week despite the obstacles that we knew that we would face.  

In the afternoon, we started to work on some of our projects that we would be working on continuously throughout the week. It was a great way to dive head on into the week. In the evening, we helped to set up and prepare for the town wide dinner. We met some of the community members and shared a meal with them. Many of the people in town were more than willing to have us sit at their table and they welcomed conversation.

Our days have started off with a morning mile and, then, moved onto work projects after a delicious breakfast. Our group was divided into subgroups to work on various projects. Some of the work projects have included cementing the whimsical path to the future playground site, putting up the walls on Elvis and Renessa’s new home (which we finished! Yay!), working on the garden, and cutting and painting pieces of plywood for a new buffalo art installation. 

(Almost) raising the roof!:  The Sacred Heart group works with our friends Kee and Elvis to get the exterior supports of the house complete!

(Almost) raising the roof!: The Sacred Heart group works with our friends Kee and Elvis to get the exterior supports of the house complete!

Although the work is challenging, we know that the work we are doing is going to benefit the individuals in LaPlant.  

In the afternoon, we had camp and got to meet some of the amazing children. At first, the children were quiet and didn’t really interact with us. Many of us have had experience with children and, during our evening conversation of "highs and lows," the unresponsiveness of the children was a universal "low." 

The kids have to get re-accustomed to new people every week, which must be really hard. They get close to someone in a short amount of time and then those volunteers leave, and are replaced with others.  However, that next day there was something different about the children. They were more open with us and asked us to do things with them like craft or play basketball.  

Basketball remains the go-to activity with the kids! (E. Russell, La Plant, June 2015)

Basketball remains the go-to activity with the kids! (E. Russell, La Plant, June 2015)

A moment in the powwow grounds!  (E. Russell, La Plant, June 2015)

A moment in the powwow grounds! (E. Russell, La Plant, June 2015)

We did some drawing activities, bracelet-making, made some mosaic kites, played kickball, knockout, basketball, jump roped, and played some board games.

Hearing their laughs and seeing their smiles made our day better.

On Tuesday night, we had bingo night at the Community Center. It was great to be able to see the town, young and old alike, enjoying the game, as well as the weather.  

On Wednesday, Barbara, a La Plant resident, was kind enough to tell us about what her life was like. It was difficult to hear some of the things she was saying, especially when she became so emotional talking about her experience with the boarding schools. We had no idea that some teachers at her school were actually Lakota themselves. Hearing a first-hand account of what it is like to live here on the Reservation was not only eye-opening but also extremely powerful.

It's a conversation that we won't easily forget.