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18 Reynolds St.
East Norwalk, CT
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Dedicated to building bright futures for impoverished children, their families, and their communities.

Field Notes from the Reservation: No rest for the weary!

Simply Smiles blog

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Field Notes from the Reservation: No rest for the weary!

Alex Gross

Today’s blog posts are brought to you by volunteers Kathy West and Stu Constantine from First Congregational Church of Stamford. 

We arrived on Saturday evening and acclimated ourselves, going to sleep with full stomachs and a big orange moon in the night sky. We’re all sleeping together on the floor of the community building, and thankfully no one snored too loudly. 

Sunday was a beautiful day, not too hot with a nice breeze and bright blue skies. After a pancake breakfast we got a full tour of the community center. We learned about the history of the community center building, and how it was fully renovated a few years back. The land for the community center was donated by Sam D. Horse several years ago, with hopes that it would help to create a gather point for youth and their families in the area. We learned about the garden, and the plans for expanding the high tunnel structure into a full greenhouse. We also got a tour of the new horseshoe pits, which are built to official specs. 

Later, we toured the town of La Plant, learning about the history of the community and some of the challenges faced by the people living here. We saw the house currently under construction, and also saw one house that will be completed by the end of the summer. 

After lunch we broke into teams and went off to various project sites to make some progress, and to get ourselves set up for a full day on Monday. For those who thought we wouldn’t have enough to do, we’ll be putting up a ceiling and interior walls in the new house, building two storage sheds, a climbing wall, a new walkway, and preparing the ground for a new playground, among other things! 

Sunday night we had a community dinner, with several local families joining us for grilled chicken and salad. After dinner the kids played a huge game of kickball as the sun set while the older folks played horseshoes and traded stories. We’ll sleep well tonight, and tomorrow will be a big day. 

* * * * *

Today was a full-fledged work and camp day. It was some of the hardest work we've ever done. We broke up into teams and made some progress on various projects:

  • Digging posts for a new playground set
  • Garden work and refurbishing the greenhouse covering (no small task, the greenhouse frame is 13’ tall and 72’ long) 
  • Building soffits and hat tracks (hope you are impressed with my technical language) on one of the new houses being constructed for a family.
  • Putting up a new shed at one of the completed houses
  • Making and pouring cements for a walkway 
  • Constructing a rock climbing wall

Also, very importantly, it was the first day (for us) for the Summer Camp with the kids. We were very ambitious with our arts and crafts and games planned. We picked up some kids in the Big Red Bus and others showed up from what seemed to be from out of nowhere. The kids made lanyards and friendships bracelets, colored, played basketball and kickball, and a multitude of other “stuff” too numerous to mention.

Bonding over art projects. (Z.Gross, August 2015, La Plant)

Bonding over art projects. (Z.Gross, August 2015, La Plant)

At the end of our exhausting day, Zach announced that we would be rewarded with a trip to the mighty Missouri River. This brought rounds of hoops and hollers and applause. Wow, what a trip! Nearly 25 miles away through constant and abundant rolling prairie hills with scattered cows and horses but very, very few houses or people. Watching the grown men and women of our churches (and yeah, the youngsters too, but this is normal for them) run down to the water’s edge and plunge in was quite the sight - something we'll always remember - just pure joy and fun.